George 90. George Dantzig will go down as

George Dantzig, born on November 8th, 1914 in Portland, Oregon, is legendary in the mathematics world. George Dantzig used both his positive thinking along with his mathematical ability to solve the unsolvable. George Dantzig solved a math equation without knowing that it was considered an unsolvable equation and went on to be a legend in the mathematical community. It was while he was a grad scholar at Berkeley in the 1940s that Dantzig demonstrated the unusual brand of genius that would eventually further him to almost mythical status in the O.R community (an elite math community). “Dantzig, believing he was working on a couple homework assignments, instead solved two famous “unsolvable” problems that had stumped generations of mathematicians.”1 It took him weeks of working on these equations and positive thinking that he could do it that he finally finished them and gave them to his professor. He thought they were weeks late but instead he found out that he solved the unsolvable. His professor wanted to have them published. This was the moment Danzig became a legend. “During World War II, Dantzig served as chief of the Combat Analysis Branch for the Air Force statistical control unit, setting the stage for his greatest accomplishment.”1 After completing his Ph.D., George moved back to Washington to work there as a mathematical adviser for the United States. Air Force. In 1947 while he was working at the Pentagon, he created linear programming to automate the planning process. This man went on to do many great things but all good things come to an end. George Dantzig passed away on May 13 in 2005 at the age of 90.          George Dantzig will go down as one of the biggest legends in math history. He solved the unsolvable with his positive thinking and mathematical talent. He could never have finished it if he didn’t put his mind in a positive setting even though it was hard at times. Learning about his mathematical ability early helped to show that this was something he enjoyed doing and wanted to do as a career in the future. He was willing to do whatever he needed to do to get it. So if there is something you want to do, put 110% into it to achieve your dreams, you might do the impossible. http://www.orms-today.org/orms-6-05/dantzig.html1https://www.snopes.com/college/homework/unsolvable.asp2https://meangreenmath.com/2014/11/19/story-of-george-dantzig/3