In also child-only cases where AFDC recipients were

In the policy it appears that some were aided more than others; the  “Former Aid to Families with Dependent Children Program (AFDC) program provided cash assistance to children whether they were in care of relatives or their own parents, these families were eligible for Wisconsin Works (W2) employment program.”(Mckin, 1998)  The purpose was to provide parents with incentives and assistance to become economically self-supporting (Department of health and families) There was also child-only cases where AFDC recipients were children living with relatives or disabled parents; child-only families cases were not eligible for W-2. For children with disabled parents there was a new program Caretaker Supplement program that replaced AFDC. Caretaker Supplement program provides disabled parents with $100 per month for each eligible dependent child. (Mckin, 1998) Current State statutes require that only one type of income to be considered in determining a family eligibility for Kinship Care. Children receiving Supplemental Security Income for permanent disability are not eligible for Kinship Care. As explained there were some families that benefited from the program and there was other programs that did not receive any benefits at all. (Mckin, 1998) There were a few indications that the policy was efficient based on the money that was provided to families in Kinship Care. When the policy was first created the rate Kinship families were given  was $215 per child per month. Later $220 was given to every child per month in 2011. However, both the agency and the court must approve continuation of these placements. (Children’s Rights, 2011) Relative/s who had or will have a child placed with them after January 1, 2010 must apply for a license. If these families do not apply for a license, the agency must approve the continued placement. The kinship caregiver will not receive any financial support for the care of the child if they family does not apply for a license. Unfortunately  the court does not have to  make a determination that the placement is “safe, appropriate, and necessary.”(Children’s Rights, 2011)