Reeaz to the written version while the opening

Reeaz Parbat                                                                                                                        

ENG 126

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Prof. Theresa Rooney

12/08/2017                                                           

Formal
Paper 2: A multimedia Analysis of ‘A Doll’s House’

In Henrik
Ibsen’s ‘A Doll’s House’, the1973 movie version by Joseph Losey better depicts a
more compelling story than the written version, specifically with the character
of Christine Linde. The play ‘A Doll’s House’ takes place in the late 1800’s in
Norway, where men were seemed more superior than women. Men usually takes up
the role of the sole bread winner and take care of the household. Christine is
a friend of Nora, was once engaged to Krogstad whom was convicted of fraud.
Christine was forced into marrying another person because of her responsibilities
towards her family. She became a very independent woman who worked very hard in
her life. But now she came to Nora looking for a purpose to live for. She sees
how happy Nora is with her husband and children. She wants to work for someone
else rather than just herself. However, Krogstad was working at Nora’s husband
bank and Torvald is to be the now Bank Manager, is strongly contemplating on firing
him because of his past and his reputation that he has within the community. What
makes the movie version
a more compelling than the written one is that, the movie uses a new script to
which gave more effectiveness in the scenes whiles creating a good path towards
character development, another reason is that the order in which the three acts
were played out were significantly different in the movie which helped in the
audience to have a better understanding of each character’s background.

In the written
version, Christine is shown as a friend to Nora, however, in the movie with its
first scene, shows how more deeply and close the relationship with Christine
and Nora is. As in the written version, Nora is unable to remember her friend
even though Christine is in front of her, ‘Nora- (doubtfully). How do you
do—Mrs. Linde – You don’t recognize me, I suppose. Nora – No, I don’t know—yes,
to be sure, I seem to—(Suddenly.) Yes! Christine! Is it really you?’ (Ibsen;
Act I). This scene took place in Helmer’s house according to the written
version while the opening scene of the movie shows Christine and Nora chatting
in a small diner, their conversation shows how close they are as friends. As
Nora says to Christine, ‘We must write to each other…every week…you must come
to visit us whenever you wish’ (Losey – A Dolls House; 1973). This drastically
contrast the written version, and while the movie scripts are not 100% in line
with the written version, it does give a better understanding with the
relationship between Christine and Nora.

In the written
version, Christine is shown as a woman that have gone through a lot, having
experiences with life and its hardship, but somehow the notion that she feels
she is more knowledgeable, smart, and even sometimes, discourteous type of
friend, is imbedded within the story. As in the scene, where Nora talks about
Dr. Rank with Christine, Christine’s response is completely left out in the
movie version in order to have the character’s relationship with Nora to seem
questionable. ‘Mrs. Linde – Listen to me, Nora. You are still very like a child
in many ways, and I am older than you in many ways and have a little more
experience. Let me tell you this—you ought to make an end of it with Doctor
Rank. Nora – What ought I to make an end of? Mrs. Linde – Of two things, I
think. Yesterday you talked some nonsense about a rich admirer who was to leave
you money—Nora – An admirer who doesn’t exist, unfortunately! But what then?
(Ibsen; Act II). That scene went on with Nora having no understanding of what
Christine is implying or accusing her of but Christine’s response is, ‘Don’t prevaricate, Nora. Do you suppose I don’t guess who
lent you the two hundred and fifty pounds’ (Ibsen; Act II). The whole use of
the word ‘prevaricate’ highlights the difference between the two versions,
whereas in the movie, Christine’s response was ‘Nora, don’t you think I know
that Dr. Rank loan you the money?’ (Losey – A Dolls House; 1973) with Nora’s
response, ‘Are you mad? I wouldn’t have dream of such a thing’. The movie scene
stays in line with each character and their development. The use of Christine
in the story is to serve as a direct comparison to Nora’s character, the movie
supports this notion. So that Christine does not seem to be patronizing Nora
and creating a type of conflict between the two characters, since their
decision at the end of the story are very different which makes their choice
more effective.