The Movements and Reactions of Dogs in Crates and Outside Yards

At present, several dogs live as treasured cohorts and chums for the young and old similarly and frequently are treated as indispensible elements of the family. However, since most dog owners confine the dogs at home improperly during the day when they go to work, dogs undergo social withdrawal which in turn affects the movements and reactions of dogs.

This study discusses the types of movements and reactions exhibited by dogs in the two confinement areas, the crate and the outside yard. According to theoretical and empirical research, dogs confined in yards exhibit unwanted behavior like barking, chewing and digging while those confined in crates exhibit behaviors like hyper impulsivity and social withdrawal.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Throughout its early relationship with human being, the dog acted as a gifted and an indispensible support for survival. In various parts of the globe, dogs were sorted to guard homes, move farm animals and support hunters.

However, as our customs developed and modern expertise took the place of most of the dog’s responsibilities, the dog’s working role reduced. At present, several dogs live as treasured cohorts and chums for the young and old similarly and frequently are treated as indispensible elements of the family.

However, since most dog owners confine the dogs at home improperly during the day when they go to work, dogs undergo social withdrawal which in turn affects the movements and reactions of dogs. Adjustment difficulties often manifest themselves in form of destructive behaviors, excessive vocalization and hyper active movements (Case 205).

It is important to confine dogs properly when one is away from home. Dog trainers and behaviorists report that difficult matters frequently occur in owner-absent dogs that are not confined well, especially those that are usually left in a dog crate for a long time or outside the possessors yard (Dunbar 156).Most dogs never get challenging opportunities that come as a result of exposure to the outside world as they are always confined in yards (Miller 56).

While in the yard, the dog intensely goes through social deficiency and thus resorts to barking, chewing and digging so as to alleviate distress. Left alone in the yard, many dogs will spend much time barking so as to reduce boredom and to seek attention from the absent pack (Dunbar 156).Dogs left at home may also bark in reaction to outside stimulus, a threat, physical needs or annoyance (Miller 57). Too much barking is much dangerous once it becomes habitual as changing it is very difficult as long as the dog stays outside.

Most dogs build up a habit of digging when left unattended in the yard (Donaldson 34). Though, some types of dogs are more likely to exhibit digging manners than others, many dogs will finally dig in reaction to a smell, to bury an item, to be reunited with their group, to preserve or diffuse heat, or to amuse themselves. Digging is also hard to stop once developed (Case 207).

Dogs left at the outside yard develop destructive chewing. Most dogs in the yard chew so as to alleviate nervousness, monotony or just for pleasure (MC Connell 76). Similar to digging and barking, chewing is a normal canine action that can be foreseen and channeled. Clearly, if we are not there to mediate, this action can lead to damage of property and can cause severe hurt to the dog, such as intestinal obstruction or damage.

There are other reactions that are exhibited by dogs that are confined outside. Some dogs will engage in self-damaging actions such as making lick granulomas to ease their nervousness or monotony (Case 207). The enclosure itself may strengthen any basic territorial violence in vulnerable dogs.

Dogs left outdoor may experience unkind or inconsiderate behavior from human beings, with lasting behavioral effects, or can be uncovered from undomesticated or wandering animals, which can spread infections and parasites (Miller 57). Outdoor dogs can build up storm fears and are at a danger of acquiring heatstroke and hypothermia. Dogs left alone outside tend to jump, scale the barriers, excavate under the fence, or get through electric barriers so as to ease their suffering or to trail some outside stimulus (Case 207).

On the other hand, some dogs left indoors are usually confined in crates. Paradoxically, the very tool that is intended to provide safe indoor confinement, the crate, is at times used well or wrongly creating problems instead of reducing them (Donaldson 35). Dogs restricted in crates for extended periods of time may build up unwanted behaviors, and too much crating often aggravates any previous behavior problem.

Too much use of the crate can create a dog that is hyper impulsive outside the crate (Donaldson 35). Equally, many dogs that are crated for long durations become depressed. An already existing behavior like hostility or diffidence may strengthen in reaction to the dog’s aggravation at being crated too much. Conversely, a crate can act as a dog’s cave that is a source of security and relieve in the absence of the owner, if used correctly (Miller 78).

Avoiding undesirable behavior by using the right way of confinement at home is easier than regulating unwanted behavior after it has been formed. Since most unwanted behaviors in dogs are caused by feelings of social withdrawal, the owner should provide him with regular exercise so as to ensure that he does not feel isolated the moment the owner leaves for work. At the same time, it’s important for the owner to offer sufficient intellectual stimulation and social contact during hours of leisure.

A dog’s movements and reactions are usually determined by the environment of the dog. For the purpose of this research, we have explored the movements and reactions of dogs in different areas of confinement: in the crate and outside yard. By integrating various theoretical frameworks with natural observation we have drawn a concrete conclusion on the topic. Previous studies in this area of study have not managed to do this, making this research unique.

Natural Observation

For this study, I observed two three ear-old female dogs of the same breed. The owners of the two dogs were both employed in a certain Industrial Company in the city. One dog used to be left indoors in a crate while the other dog used to be left in the outside yard.

I observed the frequency at which the two dogs were barking, chewing, making lick granulomas, jumping, exhibiting hyper impulsivity and other general unwanted behaviors. I made these observations three times per day for two weeks, in the two different homes.
Limitations of the Experimental Evidence

The research was limited to only two dogs.

The research was limited to only female dogs.

The research was limited to a period of three two weeks.

Implications

Dogs exhibit different reactions and movements when left at home depending on the mode of confinement. Dogs that are usually confined in a crate are usually hyper impulsive, easily aggravated, depressed, hostile and totally withdrawn. On the other hand, dogs confined in the outside yard frequently bark, chew and dig. They also jump around and try to remove barriers that restrict them to their areas of confinement.

Instead of leaving a dog in a crate, it would be better to confine the dog in a room with barriers when going out for more than five hours. In case one is confining his dog to the crate one should always visit the dog during mid day if it is possible so as to offer social contact to the dog, with the aim of avoiding the development of unwanted behaviors.

If this is not possible, acquire the help of a friend, a pet sitter or a neighbor. No dog must be crated all through the day as this is harmful to the dog. Finally, be ready to keep your dog active immediately you reach home. Whether he was restricted when you were not there or not, you cannot expect him to wait for you unwearyingly as you place your feet up and examine the paper, when you get home from work.

You should be aware that the dog has been trying to cope with social deficiency the whole day and thus is worthy your complete concentration once you arrive. Obviously you cannot leave your job so as to settle home with your dog, but with arrangement, pre-emptive guidance, and the right confinement, you can create those inescapable times of social separation much less hectic for him.

Future Trends

Further research can be done on the same but using two different breeds of dogs. As this research was done during the day, another research can be done at night for comparison.

Conclusion

In conclusion, since most dog owners confine their dogs at home during the day when they go to work, it’s important to do it properly. This will aid in reduce the chances of the dog developing undesired behaviors.

As seen from the theoretical and empirical research, both methods of confining dogs; confining the dog in a crate and leaving the dog in the yard; result to different undesirable behaviors. However, confining dogs in a crate results to more severe unwanted behavior. Since we cannot leave work to stay with our dogs, it is preferable to confine dogs in the outside yard.

According to the theoretical and empirical research, dogs confined in yards exhibit different unwanted behaviors. While in the yard, the dog intensely goes through social deficiency and thus resorts to barking, chewing and digging so as to alleviate distress. They spend much time barking so as to reduce boredom and to seek attention from the absent pack. Dogs also dig when left unattended in the yard .

However, some types of dogs are more likely to exhibit digging manners than others, many dogs will finally dig in reaction to a smell, to bury an item, to be reunited with their group, to preserve or diffuse heat, or to amuse them. Most dogs left in the yard also chew so as to alleviate nervousness, monotony or just for pleasure.

Other reactions and movements of dogs in the yard include: self-damaging actions such as making lick granulomas, jumping, scaling the barriers and excavating under the fence. Dogs restricted in crates for extended periods of time may build up unwanted behaviors, and too much crating often aggravates any previous behavior problem. Equally, many dogs that are crated for long durations become depressed. An already existing behavior like hostility or diffidence may strengthen in reaction to the dog’s aggravation at being crated too much.

Works Cited

Case, Linda. The Dog: Its Behavior, Nutrition and Health. New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2005.

Donaldson, Jean. The Culture Class. London: James and Kenneth Publishers, 1996.

Dunbar, Ian. How to Teach a New Dog Old Tricks. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Mc Connell, Patricia. The Other End of the Leash. London: Sage, 2003.

Miller, Pat. The Power of Positive Dog Training. London: Thomson Learning, 2008.

x

Hi!
I'm Barry!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out